Age doesn’t matter (if you are trying trying to build a billion-dollar startup)

Across billion-dollar companies, the age range is quite substantial. Some founders were as young as eighteen, others as old as sixty-eight when they started their companies. The median age of a billion-dollar startup’s founder was thirty-four years old—meaning half the founders of billion-dollar startups were that age or older when they got started. The distribution of age is more or less the same in the random group of startups, meaning that a founder’s age—whether younger or older—doesn’t correlate strongly with the success of their company. In other words, age doesn’t matter. The data showed a slight advantage for the younger founders, but it was not statistically large. However, the data showed that the companies which were founded by the younger group (age thirty-four or younger) had created a larger value on average.


This is one of the many passages I read in books and articles on a daily basis. They span many disciplines, including art, artificial intelligence, automation, behavioral economics, cloud computing, cognitive psychology, enterprise management, finance, leadership, marketing, neuroscience, startups, and venture capital.

I occasionally add a personal note to them.

The whole collection is available here.